SoulProviders 2015 Fleektionary
Dec14

SoulProviders 2015 Fleektionary

In 2015 a number of slick slang terms became part of our vocabulary. If you’d like to add some spice to your chats with homegrown urban lingo, take a page out of the SP Fleektionary 2015. On a 100 – expression for perfection. Kaizer Chiefs’ performance in the PSL this year was on a 100. Mama, I made it (also shortened to #mimi) – expression used when you achieve something of great value. Just bought a new house #mimi Cav – imperative used to instruct someone to look at something. Cav my new sunglasses! Fetch – to address someone when he/she has disrespected you and it is expected of you to retaliate. Friend, Thobi said you don’t look nice today. Fetch haaa! Drag – to tarnish someone’s reputation. They dragged Bonang on Twitter today. Miss me – expression used when someone doesn’t want to be involved in something or with someone, or is uninterested. I don’t watch that show. It sooo repetitive. Just miss me with that. Lit – describes something extremely exciting and fun. The party was so lit yesterday! Squad – group of friends I’ll be chilling with my squad tonight. Adeleing – being emotional about something, especially something that you claim is no longer an issue. I was adeleing all day. I can’t dzeal. Inner – describes someone who claims to be something or behaves as someone they are not. This guy has been posting photos all day. He’s such an inner model. The most – describes someone doing something excessively. That girl is doing the most on Twitter. Dololo – the lack of something. I am so hungry but dololo food. Unlock – expression used when you are on the verge of great achievements, i.e. landing a big, new job. I’m so excited about my first day tomorrow. About to unlock new possibilities. Woes – friends (made popular by a song by Drake entitled Know Yourself) Can’t wait to chill with my woes this weekend. Woke – to be highly conscious and alert. You need to be woke in South Africa because so much is happening. Spicy – describes nastiness or used as an expression with a meaning similar to ‘rubbing salt into someone’s wounds’. That girl was being spicy when she said we should not talk to her. Files – evidence that could potentially be harmful, especially in digital form and taken from a social media mishap, e.g. screenshots of message threads. I was not ready when the files on that celebrity were...

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Dealing with being in your 20s in Twenty-15…
Nov23

Dealing with being in your 20s in Twenty-15…

By Yachna Singh Your 20s is that awkward decade where you’re not sure if you should be listening to Beyonce or Whitney Houston. Are you just a kid trying to make it in an adult world? Should you be feeling that sophisticated, should-be-getting-married-soon kinda vibe? Your friends are either travelling the world, single or having their third kid and sharing Momtastic posts on Facebook. You think to yourself – where am I, and WHAT am I doing with my life? In 2015, just how planned out can your life actually be, though? You can have the world today, and the universe tomorrow – how much is too MUCH too soon? Whether you’re in your early or late 20s, careers don’t have an age limit; experience and work ethic counts the most. There’s also no age limit to getting married and, hey, don’t just have kids for the sake of having them. Have them if YOU want them, not because your parents want to be grandparents, or your best friend’s turned into a soccer mom. The most important thing to do is to stay real and remember your purpose. It’s remarkable to observe people you see as role models; see their craziness, brilliance and their deeper thought processes. Before you know it, with focus and regular reflection, you see yourself becoming those people, slowly but surely. This growing up thing is strange to say the least, but you must remember that your thoughts, experiences and life plans can never be wrong – they’re all just a way of reminding you what you can achieve. And that’s anything.    ...

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Goodluck, and bon voyage!
Nov20

Goodluck, and bon voyage!

By Ludwig Spies South Africa’s coolest electronic band, Goodluck, is now sailing with Armada Music. They sat down with us for a chat about their music, their popularity and their anonymity… Goodluck is possibly South Africa’s most ironic musical act. Although they have produced a record number of chart toppers and been touring Europe since their inception in 2011, the name Goodluck often elicits a blank expression. Play one of their songs, however, and people will sing along without difficulty. Hence, it is quite poignant that the collaboration that got them signed with Armada Music was with Dutch house DJ Jeroen Maas aka De Hofnar. Maas chose the epithet, Court Jester, to signify his entertainment philosophy: “You are the kings, I’m just here to entertain you”. Goodluck have followed a similar approach. Traditionally a no-noise, no-press type of band, their priorities are the music, the audience and having fun. Signing to Armada is big though. The label is the love child of ARmin van Buuren, MAykel Piron and DAvid Lewis and has under its umbrella some of the biggest names in the electronic dance scene. Goodluck has always been comfortable with bringing in another voice or talent to create the perfect sound, and this has seen them work with some major players. Lisa Kekaula, vocalist for Basement Jaxx, is the fierce voice on Harlem (2011) and What Would We Be (2013); and Phoenix Kayode infused their track Electro Thing (2011) with his South-East London grooves. The result has been a truly international sound, further enhanced and refined by their continual exposure to the European music scene whilst on tour. “Touring internationally as a South African band in this music scene is a complicated situation,” says Ben Peters, who does production and percussion. “I think South African artists still have something of an inferiority complex. I think we often look at ourselves and wonder whether we look as good as the rest of the world when we’re singing or playing or dancing. This is a valid question. Our industry is comparatively young, and we don’t have that production history or legacy. So we have always tried to reference ourselves against the international scene in our pursuit of attaining international standards.” Their global sound has, again ironically, contributed to their ‘anonymity’. “Just a few months ago at a gig in Stellenbosch, this guy came up to us after the show, and he’s like, ‘You guys are really awesome, but you should consider doing some original stuff.’ And we thought, ok, we literally don’t have a single cover in our set… He just didn’t know that the songs he had heard on...

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Jozi Lights for Durbanites
Nov20

Jozi Lights for Durbanites

By Yachna Singh Over-populated…too much traffic…too few jobs… As an Indian Durbanite, you’ve heard that way too many times to even think straight about leaving home. “What will you do? What will you eat? You can’t live with someone else, are you NUTS?” Yes, mother dearest, father dearest and 45th cousin dearest. Before you know it, that bloody landline is ringing off its rocker with aunties and uncles frantically wanting to know when you are leaving and adding, “You must come home for dinner before you move”. But common homely traditions and habits aside, what’s the real deal? Is it worth leaving your coastal, forever-summer home for the Jozi buzz? Honestly, I never thought I would be “that chick”, moving to an inland urban city – but now that I have done it, with the amount I’ve learnt and am still learning, I’ll say it’s definitely worth it. Working in the digital industry means serious time management, creativity and, by far the most important, the ability to learn and keep learning no matter what position you are in. After a few rough months in the big city, careers start to form quicker than you can imagine. People get to know you in the industry, and you work on brands that you only dreamed of when you lived in Durbz. One month feels like a year with the amount of work pushed out, but with a solid team and focus, overtime doesn’t even feel like work. The lavish restaurants, malls, casinos and markets make Jozi living a lot more fun over the weekends, especially if you’re a sucker for good food and wine like me. Take time for yourself though – take time to go home, see your family, have homemade food, enjoy the beach, the relaxed lifestyle and that famous bunny chow from down the road (because in Durbz, everything is down the road), and you’ll really appreciate what home is. So if you’re thinking about relocating to the big, scary, busy Jozi – don’t think too much – take the plunge and move, you never know where you’ll be in five years from now.      ...

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Two books you need to read this festive according to Lindelwa
Nov18

Two books you need to read this festive according to Lindelwa

Nnedi Okorafor – Who Fears Death? This is my first encounter with African Sci-fi (or Afro-futurism, if you may) and I loved it! I must confess, I had no idea what to expect – how do we talk about voodoo and muti in a futuristic sense? Nnedi laid it all down. One (I) might be apprehensive when reading about African “culture,” for lack of a better word, from someone whose life was spent mostly in the US, but to my surprise the book is relatable. All the characters are real; they read like people I know in my own life, and that’s one of the reasons why this book is AMAZING. It tells the story of a young lady coming of age and discovering so much about herself, her lineage and the purpose she was born for. Excellent, excellent read.   Taiye Selasi – Ghana Must Go Ghana Must Go is another first for me. You could say Nigerian authors have dominated my African reading experience, so I looked forward to learning about another place, again through the eyes of a Diaspora citizen. What I love about this book is that it catches you off-guard – nothing Selasi writes is heading in the direction you think it is, and that makes the reading experience absolutely enjoyable. I must confess, her writing style is one I had to adapt to, and I only grew comfortable with her words two-thirds into the book, but I am glad I held on. She tells the story of a broken family who are reunited by tragedy – yes, it sounds like you’ve heard this all before, but Selasi adds a little something that makes it worth the...

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