Represent Recommends: Gallery Momo
Jun12

Represent Recommends: Gallery Momo

There was something so authentic about the Gallery Momo, the second last stop on our whirlwind 5 gallery tour in Rosebank on a Saturday afternoon.  Our souls were already topped up by the mind-blowing artistic talent we had witnessed at the Alliance, the David Krut (MUST SEE!) and the Goodman (MUST SEE!) and we wondered why all the galleries were so empty when they should have been buzzing.  Then we got to the MOMO gallery in 7th ave Parktown North – we have been meaning to visit for ages.  One of the true highlights of our gallery adventure was just how welcoming and friendly the faces at nearly all the galleries were – and Momo was no exception when, within minutes, the interesting and charming down-to-earth owner Monna Mokoena, came out of his way to chat to us and welcome us to his beautifully designed gallery that is home to many an unusual contemporary artwork. Monna had us hook, line and sinker- his tales of contemporary hot and happening South African artists and their backstories keeping us wide-eyed and wanting more.  That’s why we’ll be going back this Thursday to the opening of Andrew Tshabangu’s photographic exhibition and that’s why you should be joining us too.  For what happiness is there in life without the arts? (Editorista’s latest existential theory!)  See u there. Andrew Tshabangu – biog: Born in 1966 in Soweto, Andrew has studied at a number of institutions, amongst them at the Institute of Advancement for Journalism in 1998 and at the Alexandra Community art centre in Johannesburg. He taught photography at the Children’s Photography Workshop, 1995 and in 1998 and 1999 he taught at both the Market Photo Workshop and post Matric photography courses. In 1998 he was an artist in residency at the Gasworks Art Studio, London. Tshabangu’s experience in documenting the spiritual ceremonies of black communities came into play in capturing the rituals of daily life in an African metropolis. As a photographer he is renowned for smoky, atmospheric lighting that lends a mystical element to his images. ANDREW TSHABANGU @ MOMO CITY IN TRANSITION    14 JUNE – 07 JULY OPENING THURSDAY 14 JUNE @ 18H30 52 7TH AVENUE PARKTOWN NORTH JOHANNESBURG T: +27 11 327 3247 http://www.gallerymomo.com/...

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Represent Review: Storm in a Teacup
Jun12

Represent Review: Storm in a Teacup

Represent is so much richer for the wonderful flavour that our Representah Reuben “The Matrix” Malema’s words bring to our community.  Reuben caught “Storm in a Teacup” , one of the performances featured in the showcase of Wits School of Arts “Masters’ and Honours’ students research projects… as usual, he gave it the “Full Matrix”.  See some photo’s here: A masterpiece of skillful art direction, well designed stage décor, a bag of laughs to last the whole week and flawless film-noir expertise! These are but a few of the phrases used to describe the grand finale of the little over 45 minutes – 3 member cast, music-filled theatrical satire: A Storm in a Teacup by Team Best Productions (Wits Theatre). The setting is a fast-paced disastrous office ambience, made more apparent by the relentlessly authoritarian company boss – Mr. Bill Sampson (played by Bryan van Niekerk), who seems to be lost in a care-free; self-centered life rather than effectively steering the reigns of his family’s enterprise. Storyline:  The Christmas party co-ordinator, Zetie (played by Naomi van Niekerk) gets ditched by (already paid for) one “DJ Spear” at the eleventh hour.  She also has to deal with a Father Christmas – Patrick (played by Asher Stoltz) who’s not too keen to be resident Santa clause, but would rather make known his secret affection for the worker-bee: Zetie.  The story is an all too familiar experience for many corporate employees who get engaged in the hustle and bustle of organizing the much anticipated annual company Christmas party. And from the immediate reciprocity of many an audience member, the play reeled–out a somewhat timely aha! moment which I dare call a majority affirmation of a very noticeable and much appreciated “dé jà vu”! This play was nothing like any of the other plays that I’ve seen before and its director (Gordon Lindsay) strongly concurred with my statement by alerting me to the fact that Team Best (as they affectionately call themselves) went to elaborate lengths to push the boundaries and to a certain degree radically warp traditional theatre styles by “literally staging the play inside a collection of hand-held aluminum rectangle frames”. The unusual props not only produced a creative visual effect pointing to the “behind the scenes” brewing of “a storm in a teacup”, but also captivated the mesmerized audience’s attention, pulling their concentration to each “framed-in scene” while still having a full perspective of the entire set  –  nothing else, but a given!  Like any well narrated contemporary adult story; A Storm in a Teacup has many of the usual elements which characterize such theatrical acts, vis-à-vis: Jealousy amongst colleagues (for the only girl!), hidden passion, rush decisions made in an...

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