Represent Photo’s: Sanzalicious @ Spaza
Jun25

Represent Photo’s: Sanzalicious @ Spaza

Let’s hope we won’t be struck with a snowstorm for saying this, but we think winter is being really kind to us here in Jozi.  Supposedly we’re on the downhill to sprummer which is a wonderful notion, but right now the days are gloriously mild and balmy.  We can’t complain.   What better way to avert the ‘cold’ Sunday bedroom blues than a delicious outdoor lunch prepared by none other than Sanza Fakudze the soulful vegetarian chef at the sunny Spaza Art Gallery in Troyville.  We’ve been going to feast on his delights for about three years now and we’re never disappointed.  The sun streams into the courtyard, the crowd is eclectic, the mood laid back, the conversation enriching and the food delicious.  At R30 a dish for interesting and subtle flavours and the most reasonably priced drinks in Jozi, it’s a winner for pre-month-end.  Click here to see some pics of the day out – contact the Spaza gallery to find out when next the Sanzalicous is in the 2010 ‘hood.  More...

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Represent Review: The Invader

Catch The Invader this week at Wits Theatre – our Representah Linda gives us her view on the seemingly controversial play:  I sit down in the Wits Amphitheatre, ready to watch the play “The Invader”. A very loud rock song is pulsing through the speakers, filling the auditorium. I can’t figure out what the song is because I don’t know any rock music released post-1992, when I finished school and began to exercise my long-awaited right to choose what music to listen to. But I digress…. The song is LOUD… but through it I can hear voices raised, people are fighting, a man and a woman. The argument seems to be coming from backstage, and seems quite incongruous with the song, so I’m wishing the stage manager would realise they’ve left the music on, and turn it off, because the play is about to start. It carries on though, and I start thinking… maybe there’s a serious argument backstage and the music is being played to drown it out while we wait. All kinds of scenarios are playing themselves out in my imagination about who is arguing – maybe the director cheated on his actress girlfriend, and she is now refusing to go on stage; or somebody is throwing an artistic tantrum about the props…(yeah I’m a gossip junkie, sometimes).  The drama unfolds in my mind until I realise the backstage argument is part of the script. A young girl comes running out on stage, a pantsula type of dude right on her tail yelling and screaming all kinds of obscenities at her. She is running from him, trying to duck his hands slapping her, trying to outrun his feet kicking her, she’s frantically throwing whatever obstacle she can find into his path to slow him. But he catches up to her and assaults her. The scene is rough. He beats her, calls her a whore, and rapes her. All the while the rock tune continues playing, LOUD. While I want it to stop playing so I can hear better what he’s saying to her, I’m actually grateful it is playing, so I don’t have to hear it; and the song also distracts me from listening to her anguished screams. Much respect to the young actress, she will go far. This is the powerful opening scene of “The Invader”. The rest of the play is about the theme of rape and sexual violence – from the story of rape victims turned sexual aggressors, to women raped at a young age, who think they’ve dealt with the issue until it comes back to haunt them in adult life, to male victims of rape....

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Represent Review: Storm in a Teacup
Jun12

Represent Review: Storm in a Teacup

Represent is so much richer for the wonderful flavour that our Representah Reuben “The Matrix” Malema’s words bring to our community.  Reuben caught “Storm in a Teacup” , one of the performances featured in the showcase of Wits School of Arts “Masters’ and Honours’ students research projects… as usual, he gave it the “Full Matrix”.  See some photo’s here: A masterpiece of skillful art direction, well designed stage décor, a bag of laughs to last the whole week and flawless film-noir expertise! These are but a few of the phrases used to describe the grand finale of the little over 45 minutes – 3 member cast, music-filled theatrical satire: A Storm in a Teacup by Team Best Productions (Wits Theatre). The setting is a fast-paced disastrous office ambience, made more apparent by the relentlessly authoritarian company boss – Mr. Bill Sampson (played by Bryan van Niekerk), who seems to be lost in a care-free; self-centered life rather than effectively steering the reigns of his family’s enterprise. Storyline:  The Christmas party co-ordinator, Zetie (played by Naomi van Niekerk) gets ditched by (already paid for) one “DJ Spear” at the eleventh hour.  She also has to deal with a Father Christmas – Patrick (played by Asher Stoltz) who’s not too keen to be resident Santa clause, but would rather make known his secret affection for the worker-bee: Zetie.  The story is an all too familiar experience for many corporate employees who get engaged in the hustle and bustle of organizing the much anticipated annual company Christmas party. And from the immediate reciprocity of many an audience member, the play reeled–out a somewhat timely aha! moment which I dare call a majority affirmation of a very noticeable and much appreciated “dé jà vu”! This play was nothing like any of the other plays that I’ve seen before and its director (Gordon Lindsay) strongly concurred with my statement by alerting me to the fact that Team Best (as they affectionately call themselves) went to elaborate lengths to push the boundaries and to a certain degree radically warp traditional theatre styles by “literally staging the play inside a collection of hand-held aluminum rectangle frames”. The unusual props not only produced a creative visual effect pointing to the “behind the scenes” brewing of “a storm in a teacup”, but also captivated the mesmerized audience’s attention, pulling their concentration to each “framed-in scene” while still having a full perspective of the entire set  –  nothing else, but a given!  Like any well narrated contemporary adult story; A Storm in a Teacup has many of the usual elements which characterize such theatrical acts, vis-à-vis: Jealousy amongst colleagues (for the only girl!), hidden passion, rush decisions made in an...

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Represent Review: Best of Ian & Rory
Jun06

Represent Review: Best of Ian & Rory

Sharpile to John for his words, if you’re a big fan of Ian von Memerty or Rory Rootenburg like John is, this sounds right up your alley.  The Best of Ian and Rory plays at the University Of Johannesburg Theatre on June 5, 6, 8 and 9. Booking is open at Computicket. Two lives, played out on a stage in one and a half hours – it was an honour attending the Best of Rory and Ian show at the University of Johannesburg Arts Centre. I’ve been waiting in anticipation since last year to see this show. Those that know Rory Rootenburg and Ian von Memerty will know that they are two seasoned professionals – no surprises here. The show contained clips of their careers in the music business and contained something for every music lover’s taste. My musical taste buds were tickled when Rory reprised his role as the Phantom of the Opera with two beautiful songs – taking me back to the State Theatre a few years back when the show exploded on our stages. Ian’s rendition of pop classics by Elton John and such had us rolling in the isles with laughter – man this guy can make magic with a piano. There were some sad and some serious moments as well. The segment on Jewish music had me totally lost for ten minutes – but rather than criticize, I’m willing to admit my total ignorance on the subject. The comedy came thick and fast with funny lyrics and the two performers playing a bitchy role while announcing each other – the comments had us laughing our heads off. Rory’s comedy version of Carmen and Ian’s walk through the history of South Africa were very funny and worth the price of admission by themselves. Their pianist also needs a mention. He played flawlessly and even participated in some of the antics on stage. As I said – nothing new in this show – you get what you expect from two artists of this caliber. Good, solid performances, brilliant vocals, brilliant “piano”, and a good chuckle. Go see it – I highly recommend it – they have a very limited run in Johannesburg. ************************************* PR: They are two of South Africa’s best-loved entertainers and they’ve joined forces in a hilarious and moving not-to-be-missed journey down musical lane.  The inimitable music duo of Ian von Memerty and Rory Rootenberg perform highlights from their favourite musicals in The Best of Ian and Rory which plays Johannesburg for four nights only next month. Rootenberg shares some of the great moments as The Phantom in Phantom of the Opera, does the opera...

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Represent Review: Kings Of Leon
May28

Represent Review: Kings Of Leon

We are an African site with a global outlook and let’s make it clear that we are not dependent on local media as our only source of what’s hot, happening or popular around the world.  How could we be visionary if we were?  I just happen to have one soulful cousin (what’s up bro!) in the UK with great musical taste who has promised to let me know his recommendation on the next big rock sounds for all the soulful rockers in the house (you know who you are.)  Right now Stu can’t stop listening to the Kings of Leon’s new album “Because of the Times” he sent me a track (now I’m no rocker) but in my old school opinion it definitely has a touch of Counting Crows and is certainly moreish with lots of depth: STU RECOMMENDS ROCK FOR REPRESENT From the Springsteenesque opening track ‘Knocked Up’ to the sliding grooves of closing number ‘Arizona’, the Kings of Leon’s third album Because of the Times, propels the Nashville  clan into the upper echelon of Rock ‘n Roll order. While still keeping with their grand old recipe for course-grained, voice strained Rock ‘n Roll, the Followill Foursome have fine tuned their art to produce an album which is, surprisingly, easy on the senses. Lead Vocalist Caleb Followill’s delivery is not always comprehensible, which simply adds to the bewhiskered aura of the album. Producer Ethan Johns approach of “If it  aint broke, don’t fix it”, coupled with the King of Leon’s real world themes, forces the user to listen absorbedly. I found myself turning up the volume a number of times while listening to this album. The cheeky Rock numbers (Charmer, McFearless, My Party, Camaro) keep the Kings grounded to their roots, while the soft tone pieces (True Love Way, Ragoo, Runner, Arizona) are delicately delivered and make the album well rounded.  The Kings of Leon have matured, but their music maintains its Rock ‘n Roll innocence. If you were not a fan of the Followills before, you may well be after listening to this album. Stu (Editorista’s cuz 🙂 ) Kings of Leon King’s of Leon – “On Call” video [youtube]UEh8OL0Jj-0[/youtube] Kings of Leon on...

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