Ballet & more in G-town this year
May29

Ballet & more in G-town this year

Ah, we just got all misty-eyed and nostalgic for the spirit of the Grahamstown festival when Editorista was a student and made the pilgrimage every year with her chomees to top up her creative side… Not so long ago! We encourage everyone that loves art, music, theatre, dance, markets, walking around, great food, partying, a vibrant community spirit and meeting people from all over the world to get to this year’s Grahamstown National Arts festival. First up on the announcements is the phenomenal SA Ballet Theatre company with their performance of Don Quixote taking place in the first week of July. The country’s foremost ballet company visits The National Arts Festival in Grahamstown with an extended version of Don Quixote produced by SA Ballet Theatre Principal dancer and Coach Christian Tátchev. The feisty, funny story ballet Don Quixote is set in sunny Spain and features stars of The SA Ballet Theatre including Principals Angela Malan, Burnise Silvius, Andries Weidemann and Michael Revie. This production of Don Quixote premiered in July 2007 at The South African State Theatre to critical review. All the performances will be accompanied by The Cape Philharmonic Orchestra under the baton of Maestro Michael Hankinson. There will be three performances between 2 to 5 July at the 1820 Settler’s Monument. SABT has been invited to perform on the festival’s Main programme. Performances: 2 July 19h00 3 July 19h00 5 July 10h30 Bookings may be made at Computicket from May 5th on 083 915 8000 or visit www.computicket.com. For further information, please contact the Festival office on 046 603 1103 or email...

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Represent Recommends: Blood Orange
Jan28

Represent Recommends: Blood Orange

Blood Orange is the story of a boy’s journey toward manhood. Blacklaw weaves all the usual trials and rites of passage that go with growing up; with the realities of our childhood in the apartheid era. Our protagonist is able to tell his story against this backdrop of conflict, thus commenting on and often making light of the darkness of our past. The story is bitter-sweet, much like the fruit from which it takes its name. The partnership of Grieg Coetzee and Craig Morris is remarkable. Each of these very skilled theatre practitioners are storytellers, one verbal and one physical. This results in a performance that is multi-faceted and thick with detail. Craig Morris changes character with ease, and throughout the narrative we are introduced to many characters, yet each is distinct in accent, posture and characterisation. With Craig, only one performer is needed as opposed to a cast of hundreds. His physicalisation creates such imagery, just when you think his vocabulary of facial expressions have dried up – along comes another wonderfully vivid character. One that we can recognise… we know someone like that! As if that weren’t enough, there are these startling moments when we are reminded of Craig’s astounding dance abilities as he portrays feelings though his movement. He is only aided by the use of shadows and 4 tyres – ingeniously utilised. The piece is memory inducing and thought provoking and a testimony to the old adage ‘A spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down’. An hour and a half on stage, alone and he holds us in the palm of his hands and on his every word for, every minute. GO AND SEE BLOOD ORANGE!!! BLOOD ORANGE An adaptation of Troy Blacklaws’ novel of the same name The Market Theatre and Untouchable Productions presents 22 January – 17 February 2008 (Tues – Sat 20h15; Sun 15h15) BUY TWO TICKETS FOR THE PRICE OF ONE Available from Wed, 23 January – Wed, 30 January 2008 (ex. Tues, 29 Jan) Tickets must be purchased from the Market Theatre Box Office. Call 011 832 1641. Performed by Craig Morris Directed by Greig Coetzee Debra...

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What’s on at Wits Theatre
Nov20

What’s on at Wits Theatre

Still a few shows to catch in 007 at the WITS Theatre – Contact Cathy on catherine.pisanti@wits.ac.za for details: THE VOICE BEYOND THE VEIL Wits Amphiteatre 15 November – 01 December @ 20h15                                                                                                                    Set in a brutally transitional time in South Africa’s political history,1989 – 2006, the story spans 17 years from pre-democracy to the release of Mandela, the inauguration, 9/11 to 12 years after liberation. A gentile woman falls pregnant and is unexpectedly converted to Islam and renamed as ZAHIRA on her wedding day. It has a devastating effect on her life and her partner’s, including his battle with drug addiction. With divorce not an easy option, 9/11 spurs her to reclaim her life. This is a true story of courage and hope – directed by Sarah Roberts.   TICKETS (excl Computicket’s service charge): Tue – Thu = R 80,00 Fri & Sat = R 100,00 Students & pensioners = R 40,00                                                                                             COMING TO The Nunnery 21 – 24 November @ 19h30 Choreographed and Performed by Athena Mazarakis.                                                                          Through this ‘Anatomical Cartography’, and the exciting collision of Physical Theatre and Digital Art, Coming To charts a voyage across the perforated map-borders of the body, which allow whirlpools of memory to spill, bleed and seep into each other. TICKETS = R 10,00 pp.                                                                                                                                                                CONCERT FOR THE FESTIVE SEASON – The Black Tie Ensemble The Wits Theatre 28 November @ 20h00 The Black Tie Ensemble’s annual Concert for the Festive Season has established itself as one of the definitive concerts in this genre.  Building on the successful formula of the previous years, The Black Tie Ensemble (BTE), in collaboration with the Unisa Music Foundation, and proudly hosted by Sappi, will present A Concert for the Festive Season which will again enthral and move concert goers.  All members of The Black Tie Ensemble will take part in the concert, performing in solo and ensemble works, and The Black Tie Opera Chorus will again bring a welcome and added dimension to the event.    BTE is pleased to announce that the Chamber Orchestra of South Africa (Cosa) will be conducted by Christopher Dowdeswell.  This British-born conductor has settled in South Africa and established himself as a successful conductor of both opera and concerts.. Come and experience the stirring melodies of the Festive Season TICKETS: Full price = R 90,00 Pensioners & scholars = R 50,00 Details are subject to change. Enquiries: 011 717-1376 / catherine.pisanti@wits.ac.za  ...

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Represent Recommends: Waiting for Thandiwe
Oct11

Represent Recommends: Waiting for Thandiwe

If you didn’t catch our interview with up-and-coming theatre director/producer Kgauza Dube, then make sure you catch her show “Waiting for Thandiwe” on at the Civic NOW!  It’s warm, charming and entertaining, a great break from the stresses of life and an affordable but fulfilling night out. Support our young and full of promise artists – Go Go Go! Dates: 10-13th October 2007 – 8pm 14th October 2007 – 2pm Tickets available from Computicket @ R47 “Waiting for Thandiwe” is a witty and original South African story; the first production of the newly launched theatre company, black curtain theatre movement which aims to introduce theatre and the appreciation thereof to the demographic that represents the majority of South Africa’s population. The play is set in King William’s Town in the Eastern Cape. The main character, Lulu, is a young man who studies drama at UCT drama school in Cape Town. He is home for the school holidays and things are exactly the same as they were. Everyone thinks he is the hope of the neighbourhood…just like bra Steve (Biko) – who lived in the same street as Lulu and also went to university. No one quite understands how anyone could make a living out of “making sketches” a la Gibson Kente and Lulu ‘s mom is still the “ghetto economist” … the queen of stretching the budget! Lulu has a new girlfriend he met in Cape Town. Thandiwe is an “exile baby” who doesn’t speak a stitch of any African language. She is a well-travelled, cosmopolitan woman of the world. Despite their stark cultural differences, Lulu is smitten and itching to propose.  Today, she will be making her way to Lulu’s hometown for a visit… Lulu is in a huge panic. How is he to present himself within these surroundings? Their relationship has always had an urban and sophisticated backdrop. Does he adopt the “pantsula” persona since he is in the township, is he the holy rasta, is he the sonnet-spewing intellectual or the Xhosa traditionalist? This play highlights everyday identity issues that will strike a chord with anyone. Lulama Masimini, a UCT graduate morphs into the frenzied Lulu superbly. He is no stranger to the theatre circuit, with past performances in Big Dada and Medea (Brett Bailey) amongst others. The play premiered on the fringe at the National Arts Festival, Grahamstown to a great response, it had a short run at the Wits 969 Theatre Festival....

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Represent Review: Hurry up and catch Rent!
Aug27

Represent Review: Hurry up and catch Rent!

Seems like RENT at the recently refurbished Alexandra Theatre in Braamies has been extended an extra month – till the end of October – lucky Jozi peeps – make sure NOT to miss out on a fabulous show and if you’re in CT – get booking.  John caught the show: Wow!  I felt like a pirate finding buried treasure ! The Alexandra theatre was recently renovated and re-opened and what a gem. The place is beautiful, situated in  Braamfontein,  and reminded me of the golden days of theatre in Johannesburg. It has a different feel than the Market and a fabulously big theatre and new bar. Enough about the venue ! RENT was fabulous ! The cast is young and full of energy. It had some familiar faces like Ilse Klink (Isidingo – who knew she could sing this well??) and Aubrey Poo (Muvhango). The pace is fast and energetic and the vocals are strong and solid. The story revolves around a group of friends living in a rundown building in New York during the eighties.  One of their friends inherits a lot of dough and wants to turn the building into a cyber studio (what ever that is…) and wants to throw them out – they cannot pay their rent (hence the name). The tenants owe rent for the previous year and struggle to eat – the place is cold and damp – everyone is trying to make it in entertainment, tv, music and the like. The piece had two sections making it quite a long play – almost three hours – but it is well worth it. The songs ranged from deep and touching to beautifully crafted vocals, to outright fun and games. The story is more complicated than the usual political piece or pantomime – but left us sad at times – I even developed a bit of a flu nose at one point – and laughed out loud at other times. This production is big – the set is beautiful and sports a corner where a five piece band sits producing all the music “live” for the show. What a band ! The sound was brilliant allowing the musician’s talents to shine. Music director Bryan Schimmel impressed with some stunning music from which looked like a young band. The dance sequences were good as well with some filling the complete stage with cast members. The cast is big – the main characters make up about half and the rest are street people. The whole thing is done in “American” which turned out much better than I expected. This is quality stuff. Everyone will find something here. I wish we had...

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